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Official Double Red Biotope Journal


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#21 Kuro

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Posted 17 March 2013 - 08:13 PM

Here's a video the picture makes the tank LOOK way to dark.

biotpe wip


Edited by Kuro, 17 March 2013 - 08:13 PM.

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#22 snazy

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Posted 17 March 2013 - 08:21 PM

Kuro, why is the surface still. Get some movement for oxygen in there :ike:
Nice. I can't wait to see the wood in.

#23 Kuro

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Posted 17 March 2013 - 08:24 PM

View Postsnazy, on 17 March 2013 - 08:21 PM, said:

Kuro, why is the surface still. Get some movement for oxygen in there :ike:
Nice. I can't wait to see the wood in.

Oh shoot xD I got the water too high thanks for making me see that! I recently took out 98% of the white sand that was left and used a siphon to get it out so I was taking water out and probably took out 6 gallons and added back a lot.

Thanks! Yeah I can't wait!!! Omgawed so excited I got a huge bin Imma fill up with manzanita wood. I pray I find pieces I want. I mean I should... his property is covered in them.

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#24 Kuro

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Posted 17 March 2013 - 08:29 PM

Adjusted the little 7g filter that's running beside the aquaclear 30 to "Splash" got it at a very light tilt not enough to have any water risk spilling out but just enough to cause extra water movement~

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#25 DrRob

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Posted 17 March 2013 - 11:09 PM

You'll be fine without the lighting cut, although you may want it for the look or to keep algae down. My tank has 2 T5HO's sitting above it and the apisto that was in there was perfectly happy until it decided to take on something twice its size, was bound to happen eventually, it thought it was 10 times the size it was.

#26 Kuro

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 01:47 PM

View PostDrRob, on 17 March 2013 - 11:09 PM, said:

You'll be fine without the lighting cut, although you may want it for the look or to keep algae down. My tank has 2 T5HO's sitting above it and the apisto that was in there was perfectly happy until it decided to take on something twice its size, was bound to happen eventually, it thought it was 10 times the size it was.

Yeah I plan on keeping it reduced to this level. I think its nice and I can clearly see around the entire tank just seems photo makes it darker then what it is and camera still makes it a little darker. ANd uuuuguh needs to be Sunday already again for 1 spring break 2 manzanita hunting on someones private property I'm dying to find myself a 1-2ft piece for my tank.

I'm going to cure some wood over summer so they keep there red smooth color instead of sand blasted which imo looks ugly though I'd definitely use manzanita in a planted tank that's been sand blasted because of its texture.

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#27 minnnt

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 04:16 PM

Sounds like some good progress being made with the tank.

Have you considered changing the t8's for a lower kelvin tube so the light is more yellow? It gives a very nice effect to these kind of tanks and will make it look like there are more tanins than there actually is.

Keep up the good work. :)

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#28 Kuro

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 05:48 PM

View Postminnnt, on 18 March 2013 - 04:16 PM, said:

Sounds like some good progress being made with the tank.

Have you considered changing the t8's for a lower kelvin tube so the light is more yellow? It gives a very nice effect to these kind of tanks and will make it look like there are more tanins than there actually is.

Keep up the good work. :)

Yaeh I tried to find some but it would require me to spend 50 bucks for a new hood. Seems my hood requires florescent only. THOUGH I found a led set up that's about 50 bucks made by aqueon and I can adjust how many of the led's turn on.

I was also considering Incadescent lights but those use up a ton of electricity have a shorter life and produce a ton of heat. Would of been fantastic using the incads becaus they give off a yellow hue which would of made the tannins look even tanner. So I've found a easy way by just laying down some blocker and it reduces the light to the area I like it till I can afford a strip of Led's to replace my t8 with. I was at the store yesturday and couldn't find any that would fit into my current Aqueon full deluxe florescent hood. x----x BUT THey make the led hood that'll fit and I plan to get that.

Hopefully with pawning of 2ft pieces of manzanita wood for 40 bucks a pop I can make up enough money to buy a external ecco filter ((Rated at 198gph)) and a new light set up. Then still have enough money to pay back a loan and afford next semesters books (I recieve a bog fee waiver making 300 dollar classes cost me 4 bucks cause I'm very poor))

Can't wait for next Sunday and brining home a piece of manzanita wood for my tank.

I'm also considering holding onto to extra pieces and curing them in my California 100+ Degree heat during summer so the bark will fall off and it'll keep its red colors. Because I don't like the way sand blasted manzanita wood looks at all.

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#29 minnnt

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 06:05 PM

You can get lower kelvin t8's. They're all fluorescent, it is the kelvin rating that determines the colour of the tube.

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#30 Kuro

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 06:13 PM

View Postminnnt, on 18 March 2013 - 06:05 PM, said:

You can get lower kelvin t8's. They're all fluorescent, it is the kelvin rating that determines the colour of the tube.

Oh dang can you link me to some? I've had an incredibly hard time finding them. I was at my local places and all of them are above I think... 6400k

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#31 Guerrero

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 06:27 PM

I've got different tubes over one of my tanks, both florescent but in one the tube is quite a warm pink and the other a much brighter white.
The pinky one shows up tannins something awesome (or did until I shoved the purigen in) it looks duller despite being the same wattage

#32 minnnt

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 06:27 PM

You want some that are around 3-4k. They really do exaggerate the blackwater feel. Whiter lights often show it as a milky murky film in the water.

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#33 Kuro

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 06:34 PM

View Postminnnt, on 18 March 2013 - 06:27 PM, said:

You want some that are around 3-4k. They really do exaggerate the blackwater feel. Whiter lights often show it as a milky murky film in the water.

Hmmm guess I'll have to resort to ordering from online. My local fish stores are primarily selling lights 6k-14k bulbs.

I kinda dislike ordering online rather that in person cause its easier to handle incase something wrong happened.
I know I wanted something rated around 3-4k which is why the incadescents came to mind since they usually have a low rating but thanks I'll make sure to check around for the 3-4k bulbs. Just sad I wont be able to find these at local fish stores since the majority are sellers for planted tanks with high lights.


Also at Guerrero yeah with my current light its a white shine down which makes the tank super bright which isn't what I want. Also I know what ya mean about that pinkish glow, My 10g has a pinkish glow to it right now I have no clue why but I do enjoy it since the substrate looks more earthy with it.

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#34 minnnt

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 06:37 PM

Tubes aimed at plant growth are usually pink. You want something like a sun-glo tube I think. Your local hardware store should stock them.

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#35 Kuro

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 06:40 PM

View Postminnnt, on 18 March 2013 - 06:37 PM, said:

Tubes aimed at plant growth are usually pink. You want something like a sun-glo tube I think. Your local hardware store should stock them.


Well glad that the pinkish glow is in my planted tank and I'll make sure to check out the hardware stores since I got a membership card there and could probably score a discount. Thanks. Just now gotta find out what size is the light tube inside my 20 long hood.

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#36 snazy

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 06:41 PM

Try online. You should be able to find the K rating for all. I've got Dennerle fluorescent tubes(dennerle special plant).  They aren't the cheapest because they are for plants supposedly but they are 3000 K and I love the colour they bring out. I have them in two tanks.  It actually isn't yellow as one would presume. How we see the colour also depends on the spectrum as well.
I can't explain but it really brings out the colours of everything, instead of washing them in total white or yellow/greenish like my previous tubes. Even my fish seemed to look colourless and didn't stand out with the white tubes.
Dennerle also have the colour enhancing tubes which are very nice too on their own, but they don't say what the K rating is on them.

#37 Kuro

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 06:55 PM

Hey would this work?
http://www.homedepot...28#.UUdiVaUoOFI

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#38 snazy

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 06:59 PM

I'll show you a short video of how my 3000K look to see if that's what you want or something else. Please don't pay attention to the plants. I chopped down my anubias and others to nothing.
The wall behind the tank is white, so it gives an idea what kind of colour the lights are giving. There's no video effects.

https://www.youtube....h?v=mjquABl1vXs

Edited by snazy, 18 March 2013 - 07:00 PM.


#39 Kuro

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 07:05 PM

http://www.homedepot...24#.UUdkwqUoOFI

Found this I LOVE THE complaint~~ BTW read this
I think I found my light! and its 18 inches in length compared to the top one which is 16 inches in length this is also some how cheaper xD






I purchase this bulb to replace my aquarium bulb that had burned out, and what a mistake! This bulb casts a yellowish brown color into my tank. Promptly returned it and purchased an "Aqueon" full spectrum daylight bulb. Much Better.






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#40 snazy

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 07:12 PM

You can return it if you don't like the brown :P It's fairly cheap too.
To make it more complicated :), you have to keep in mind that fish also like certain spectrum, we humans can't see.

This is an interesting read:

Color or colour (see spelling differences) is the visual perceptual property corresponding in humans to the categories called red, blue, yellow, green and others. Color derives from the spectrum of light (distribution of light power versus wavelength) interacting in the eye with the spectral sensitivities of the light receptors. Color categories and physical specifications of color are also associated with objects, materials, light sources, etc., based on their physical properties such as light absorption, reflection, or emission spectra.
Because perception of color stems from the varying
spectral sensitivity of different types of cone cells in the retina to different parts of the spectrum, colors may be defined and quantified by the degree to which they stimulate these cells. These physical or physiological quantifications of color, however, do not fully explain the psychophysical perception of color appearance.

Electromagnetic radiation is characterized by its wavelength (or frequency) and its intensity. When the wavelength is within the visible spectrum (the range of wavelengths humans can perceive, approximately from 390 nm to 700 nm), it is known as "visible light".
Most light sources emit light at many different wavelengths; a source's spectrum is a distribution giving its intensity at each wavelength. Although the spectrum of light arriving at the eye from a given direction determines the color sensation in that direction, there are many more possible spectral combinations than color sensations. In fact, one may formally define a color as a class of spectra that give rise to the same color sensation, although such classes would vary widely among different species, and to a lesser extent among individuals within the same species. In each such class the members are called metamers of the color in question.

The ability of the human eye to distinguish colors is based upon the varying sensitivity of different cells in the retina to light of different wavelengths. Humans being trichromatic, the retina contains three types of color receptor cells, or cones. One type, relatively distinct from the other two, is most responsive to light that we perceive as blue or blue-violet, with wavelengths around 450 nm; cones of this type are sometimes called short-wavelength cones, S cones, or blue cones. The other two types are closely related genetically and chemically: middle-wavelength cones, M cones, or green cones are most sensitive to light perceived as green, with wavelengths around 540 nm, while the long-wavelength cones, L cones, or red cones, are most sensitive to light we perceive as greenish yellow, with wavelengths around 570 nm.
Light, no matter how complex its composition of wavelengths, is reduced to three color components by the eye.

While most humans are trichromatic (having three types of color receptors), many animals, known as tetrachromats, have four types. These include some species of spiders, most marsupials, birds, reptiles, and many species of fish.
Most light sources are mixtures of various wavelengths of light. Many such sources can still effectively produce a spectral color, as the eye cannot distinguish them from single-wavelength sources. For example, most computer displays reproduce the spectral color orange as a combination of red and green light; it appears orange because the red and green are mixed in the right proportions to allow the eye's cones to respond the way they do to the spectral color orange.
A useful concept in understanding the perceived color of a non-monochromatic light source is the dominant wavelength, which identifies the single wavelength of light that produces a sensation most similar to the light source. Dominant wavelength is roughly akin to hue.
There are many color perceptions that by definition cannot be pure spectral colors due to desaturation or because they are purples (mixtures of red and violet light, from opposite ends of the spectrum). Some examples of necessarily non-spectral colors are the achromatic colors (black, gray, and white) and colors such as pink, tan, and magenta.
Two different light spectra that have the same effect on the three color receptors in the human eye will be perceived as the same color. They are metamers of that color. This is exemplified by the white light emitted by fluorescent lamps, which typically has a spectrum of a few narrow bands, while daylight has a continuous spectrum. The human eye cannot tell the difference between such light spectra just by looking into the light source, although reflected colors from objects can look different. (This is often exploited; for example, to make fruit or tomatoes look more intensely red.