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Bought a Co2 system!


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#1 Guanchy

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Posted 13 April 2016 - 04:54 PM

finally decided to buy one, its just been a few days and the plants are looking great already! the grass is growing like crazy and looking greener than ever! super excited to see how much all the plants grow and expand!

The only problem that I'm having is fish! -_- when is not one thing is the other lol. About 2 months ago i completely messed up my cycle by removing two big amazon swords from the tank and moving the substrate around too much. Ammonia went up like crazy and i lost all my fish but one angel! little guy still holding on. about 2 weeks ago the tank got back to normal, all readings 0 etc... but my pH is super low like its below the API chart and I'm not sure whats the problem because the PH in my tap water is actually high but when i put it in the tank the PH still reads below the chart!

after it finally cycled again i bought new fish and when i put them in the tank a few hours later they started to get all these white stuff on them and the next day they died. so i went out again a few days later and bought more fish because i thought the first ones i bought were maybe sick and the same thing happened again. they died a few hours later.  Someone told me that my PH being so low maybe burnt them or something, but i can't find any topics related to that online and i don't want to start messing with my PH because i don't want the angel that i have there to die, i love that little guy. What do you guys think?


my readings are still great. so i know is not ammonia or nitrate killing them

#2 Guanchy

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Posted 13 April 2016 - 08:56 PM

reading more about this issue today and I'm thinking that maybe my driftwood might be lowering the PH. I have three pieces of them in my 30 gallon. However they arent that large so I'm not sure if this is contributing to that

#3 Vince

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Posted 15 April 2016 - 11:46 AM

Copy and paste
Mr g read this .Maybe this could help you out


CO2 and pH
There is a danger in using improperly monitored CO2. The presence of CO2 in water causes the pH to fall. This can be used to the aquarist’s advantage to lower the pH to the range preferred by most plants. However, if the water is not properly buffered, or if too much CO2 is introduced, the pH in the tank can drop quickly to levels that are lethal to fish. It is important to think of supplemental CO2 as an “additive,” just like fertilizers, pH adjustors, medications or even fish foods — all of which can create lethal conditions in your tank when added in excess. CO2 is no different. It must be used within specific parameters to ensure the safety of tank’s inhabitants.
CO2 produces a weak acid, and, as noted above, will lower the pH of a tank. For people with moderately hard water, this works out perfectly. Aquarists with water that has too much alkalinity may need to reduce the carbonate hardness (KH) by mixing their tap water with distilled or reverse osmosis water.


Those aquarists with very soft water must increase the alkalinity of their water. Without the buffering properties of KH, CO2 supplementation can cause the pH to plummet, to the detriment of plants and, more especially, the fish.
KH can be increased by the use of preparations sold exclusively for this purpose. For the more budget conscious, sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) or calcium carbonate can be added to tap water in small amounts to achieve a KH reading of between 3 and 6. Baking soda will raise only the KH. If both the KH and general hardness (GH) are too low, calcium carbonate is the better choice. One teaspoon of baking soda will increase the KH of 50 liters of water by approximately 40. Two teaspoons of calcium carbonate will increase both the KH and GH in the same amount of water by about 40. Another method of increasing both carbonate and general hardness is to prefilter water through crushed shell grit, crushed coral or dolomite gravel until the desired level is attained.
How much CO2 is enough?
As stated above, the recommended range for CO2 is between 10 and 40 mg/L. The goal should be to find a rate of CO2 supplementation that falls within this range, and produces a pH reading that is neutral (7.0) or slightly below. Avoid the extreme ends of this range. If your delivery system is not absolutely accurate, it is too easy for CO2 to move outside the recommended range.
There are commercial test kits available to tell you if CO2 is within the desired range. It is also possible to estimate the CO2 levels in your tank using the CO2 chart available at the Krib. You must know the pH of your tank water and the KH. Please be aware that this reading differs from total hardness, and buy a test kit that specifically measures the former.



this is why i back out of  buying a co2 system..too much crap to do with fish involved in the mix . good luck .

#4 Guanchy

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Posted 15 April 2016 - 02:31 PM

great read!! Vice, thank you.

#5 claire

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Posted 15 April 2016 - 10:33 PM

How long are you running your CO2 for and at what times in relation to your lighting schedule? You should have your CO2 come on 2 hours before lights on, and go off 2 hours before lights off. This means that the CO2 is at the correct level for the lights coming on for the plants to utilise. You can measure if you are adding the correct amount of CO2 by measuring the drop in pH that it causes - you should aim for it to drop by 1 between the CO2 coming on and the lights coming on. Maybe your CO2 is too high or you are running it for too long?

Claire

Now gone salty! Follow my journey into the salty side here.


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